BELCK ~ SIDEBAR

Dr. Scott Belck was born in 1966 in Morgantown, West Virginia at the height of the Great Depression, which, like most things to West Virginia, arrived late. SBGpa_PJEdit.pngBelck’s upbringing and early musical career were beset with challenges and fraught with obstacles such as when Belck’s father would often return home after a night of heavy drinking and frantically administer CPR in an attempt to revive his young son who was at the time only sleeping. There is general agreement within the trumpet community that these early incidents contributed greatly to Belck’s legendary lung capacity and phrasing and may also explain why Belck is the only trumpeter on record to successfully incorporate an electronic tuner, metronome, and defibrillator into his regular practice regimen.

Belck’s early musical studies were primarily through correspondence courses and match book covers and it was not until his 10th year that he was able to acquire a private instructor, the venerable Italian cornetist Endo Paramecium who had moved to Morgantown as part of the government’s newly instituted witless protection program. Studies with Maestro Paramecium were inspirational, as well as a source of great frustration, because the wily old master insisted on beginning each daily lesson with three rounds of bare-knuckle boxing followed by a lunch of diluted prosecco, potted ham, figs, and string cheese. Belck’s prodigious lip strength and power can be traced back to these formative lessons.

At the age of 12, his parents enrolled him in Saint Huckleberry’s Conservatoire for the Deaf, the only locally available outlet for advanced musical studies, where Belck consistently failed to distinguish himself amongst his hearing impaired schoolmates despite possessing nearly perfect hearing and relative pitch on Wednesdays and alternate weekends. Musical and academic struggles thus continued until his great breakthrough midway through his 18th year. There is some speculation that this ostensibly inexplicable development corresponded to the purchase of his first cornet mouthpiece, though the jury is still out on that account. Regardless, the details of the remainder of Belck’s career have etched themselves into the public consciousness, except in the instances where the courts have sealed the records.

Today, Belck enjoys his reputation as the “Absentee Father of the Modern American Lip Slur.” His first book “Modern Flexibilities for Brass” has quickly become one of the most popular sarcastic lip slur books in the lower South Central Ohio River Valley region and a staple of studio teachers everywhere who tend not to read the customer reviews prior to ordering on Amazon.